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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a cardinal in the roman catholic faith is someone you would say immediately is the belief style of religion, but you're so right, susanna, that all the styles were embodied in that man, and he was certainly a seeker. in fact, i had a wonderful conversation with martin marty, who that he had a chance to meet the great religious people of the world - the dalai lama, the pope, other great religious leaders - and he said that every one, they go so deeply into their own tradition, that they can find connection with other traditions. and our swami that we'll meet in the next class is exactly like that also, because he sees all religious paths as leading to a similar summit. not everybody agrees with that, yeah, you want to follow-up, susanna? >> well, i was just going to say, truly, you may have hit on it, that the deeper you go, the more you recognize. and his roots were down, and you could see there were other ones there, sort of mixing in with yours, but there is a connection. >> i love the root comment, and we want to stay with the root comment here in your beautiful piece you read to us. and
of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, -- alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores, especially fro
to find this out. listen, nobody's religion holds up under a tough scrutiny, including my own. that's for sure. and i mean, you can worship cows and suck on maple tree twigs if you want to go to heaven and that's fine. we should tolerate it. but the same deference should be shown to my religion, catholic church and the christianity, which is not really the case, bill. >> bill: you got seven. university of missouri got seven. but the wiccans and pagans got eight. now, gutfeld, i don't see anything wrong with this as long as the university is up front. this is a movement and there are wiccans and witches and they do what they do. this is america. i'm not outraged. >> i'm a class 3 warlock, which means i can turn people into frogs, see piers morgan. i think wiccans that i've met are extremely nice people, unlike some more extreme religions. they don't try to kill you. they don't fly plane noose buildings. they actually -- they don't get out on the street and preach at you. >> bill: that's right, i should have asked -- they got to have a few muslims on this calendar, too. i forgot to as
, this is religion for some and fortitude for the line and the food. >> and there is one course that was so spicey, we were crying tears. it was so good, we had to eat more. >> tears of joy? >> and around the black. >> reporter: he lives upstairs. >> and that is exciting. the cvs and duncan doughnuts before and that is for good food. >> reporter: wolfgang puck is a culin mary -- culinary king and that cooking shows and farmer's markets turned americans into smarter food consumers. >> and didn't know about ingredients. may not know how to cook it and they know what it should taste like. >> reporter: that allows the executive chef to serve up some adventurous dishes the d.c. crowd may have cringed at awhile back and maybe about the time of jobs. >> corporate tax attorney and the restaurateur. >> he did just fine, a study on booming 49th street northwest. >> we are not obviously at the level in san francisco and chicago and los angeles. once you get past the four cities, i think d.c. can hold the phone with anyone. boston, philly, atlanta, miami. >> reporter: you can see washington's culinary transfo
not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people eligible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equal basis. i think that this debate is actually
drowning out the voice of religion, the voice of faith. >> cardinal wool also says he thinks it's unlikely the next pope will be an american because the united states is considered the world's one great superpower. >>> a virginia family hoping and praying for the arrival of their little boy, a boy they already call their son. maxim right now lives 5,000 miles away in a russian orphanage. he's been there his entire 14 years. >> as andrea mccarren reports, he's one held hostage by an adoption ban posed last night. >> words can't describe how i feel. i told him today, max, you just cannot fathom how much we love you. >> maxim captured the hearts of diana and mill years ago when they met the boy on a church trip. they helped transform the orphanage into a better place to house children. >> no doubt at all, he's absolutely our son. >> abandoned as a baby, maxim has spent all 14 years in bleak russian orphanages. his stature may be small, but the wallens say his heart is huge. >> he had a spirit about him a lot of the children didn't have. he was smiling and happy, very curious, always wanted af
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
that in the industrialized world there is it a lot of people who don't stee the relevance of the religion and he wants to reenergize that faith. he started the uro faith . amms wrote a book evangelical of catholicism and calling for the church to deepen people's faith. janet? >> all right. thank you very much for the update. can you tell us about what comes next in the process? this pope had specific outreach, but what about the next one. you mentioned there may be interest in focusing on somebody to represent the different geoh, graphy. the process seems so secretive. >> i tomit give you ideas who may be in the top. it is important to understand the selection by what the church needs. if you go to the criteria and the church needs to reenergize. cardinal ravizi for culture. he's also the president of a different pontiffical commissions. he's leading the papal lenten retreat it is an honor to lead that retreat. two others had had . both went on to be the pope . cardinal schoola who is italian branch. they make up 25 percent of the cardinals and they center a big voting block . you can see cardinal ole
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
of organized religion. but i love god. start the clock now. >> reporter: because it really is a game show, there are prizes. winning teams get $20,000 each episode. but there's $100,000 for the tournament champion. all prize money, however, goes to the winning team's charity of choice. [ cheers ] >> having a baby at the age of 90, memaw. just saying. nothing's out of the realm of possibility here. >> reporter: most pastors aren't as funny as foxworthy. he assured us he's not trying to compete in that arena. he knows his limitations. >> when i started hosting "fifth grader," people certainly thought i was smarter than i was, you know. and i would say, hey, if i didn't have the cards -- the shortest show on television. and now i'm doing this and people think, well, this guy has all the spiritual answers in the world. i'm like, no, i'm still the samsame idi idiot. still two decision was drywalling, you know. >> reporter: for "today," harry smith, los angeles. >>> let's head out to the plaza and check the weather from dylan. >> good morning, lester. good morning, everyone. you're from miami?
religious liberty. he wants to define the first amendment, free exercise of religion clause to one hour a week. that's what he wants to do. he is not our friend. >> stephanie: wow. >> that's treason. >> stephanie: i was going to say that sounded a little treasony. the president of the united states is our enemy? the enemy? that's dangerous talk, isn't it? maybe the secret service needs to borrow the giant cartoon paw. [knock at door] >> isn't that the sound the cat made when he was out for the night? >> stephanie: right. >> then the cat will stay out for the night. [knock at door] >> stephanie: that concludes right-wing world. thank god. [ applause ] >> you didn't like that? >> stephanie: no. >> started to turn. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after the hour. you know, we talk about carbonite. how great was that letter i just read the other day. an item t. specialist, someone lost everything in her computer. they called the data recovery company. it will cost $2,000. what could she have done? carbonite for only $59 for the entire year? now everybody in the office has carbonite. you have all of
. people in great distress either find religion or the courts. [laughter] that is okay. we need a road map. what we are really out lying is an ongoing mission. our ideal on both sides, because we are open to all and have a level playing field. the road maps, the clarity of language, and information flows to the ultimate consumers, it is ideal. i love the fact that at the beginning of the creation, there was the thought that information flow passivity in a certain way for a certain population. i love the fact there is one for seniors because information is channeled differently for different priorities in different times. it must reflect our diversity and the delivery of regulation. we are here for the seniors. i see so many coming to the court room see how important that is. >> i wanted to move on to discussing the short term. short-term credit ends up being a death trap for a lot of consumers in a harmful way. that brings us the issue of loans and we have seen the effects. i want to bring in dawn to the conversation. there you are. you have done a lot of work in texas around this issue. m
. >> we also had sister philip michael. she taught religion. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: okay. twenty-nine minutes after the hour. right back on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] start with a groundbreaking car. good. then invent an entirely new way to buy one. no. no. no. yes! a website that works like a wedding registry. but for a car. first, you customize it. then let people sponsor the car's parts as gifts. dad sponsors the engine for your birthday. grandma sponsors the rims for graduation. the car gets funded. then you pick up your new dodge
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
could basically only study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among the few
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)